Being a leader is about being impregnable, right?

Perhaps not.

The stereotype for a strong leader is someone who has all the answers; has a “shield of steel” level of confidence that just can’t be breached.

But that’s actually not the full story.

Sure, being confident is important.

People will follow a confident leader.

Let’s face it, it’s hard to inspire people to come on a journey with you if you don’t fill them with confidence that you know what you’re doing, you believe in the mission, and you are skilled in overcoming the inescapable problems that will arise along the way.

But we have all met the impregnable leader as well, haven’t we?

You know, the one that you just know is putting up a front; a façade that that they will not allow to be breached.

Why do they do that?

It strikes me that people relate to real people and we all have our vulnerabilities.

You know, the ones that niggle away late at night, the ones that shout at you when you are standing on stage about to give a speech; the ones that actually make you think twice before acting; and the ones that have saved you on many occasions.

Actually, being vulnerable is an important element to be authentic and successful and grounded.

And people follow authentic leaders.

So why hide a great strength?

It doesn’t mean that you become a blubbering ball of uncertainty or an amoeba!

But it does mean acknowledging that you have some areas where you feel the same as everyone else – vulnerable, exposed, knowing that you have a weakness.

People will help, they will complement you and compliment you. They will better understand you. They are more likely to come on a journey with you.

So being impregnable might not be providing you the benefit you think it is. Because your brand is what other people think of you, right?

My question is this – are you brave enough to be vulnerable?

To get the slingshot effect of Synergy…

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As you know, in my view leadership is very much about creating followship.

And once you have followship, you have a group of followers, right?

I’m not a great fan of groups.

“In mathematics, a group is an algebraic structure consisting of a set of elements equipped with an operation that combines any two elements to form a third element. The operation satisfies four conditions called the group axioms, namely closure, associativity, identity and invertibility.”

Que?

Ok, ok. I’m making a point.

I like musical groups. And I guess a group of ducklings is cute!

But an effective group must become a team. And when you have a team, you can have synergy. Let’s face it, Coldplay is an amazing team producing magnificent music.

So, it’s logical that leadership is also about building a team.

But how do you make that team cohesive?

Here a re a few simple tips on making sure your group becomes a COHESIVE TEAM:

Be close to the members of your team

  • Take the time to get to each member on a personal level; know them very well
  • Be a listener and ask lots of questions
  • Encourage innovation and some individuality
  • Celebrate with them
  • Recognise their personal and professional success and achievements
  • Be hands alongside your team members on when you need to be

Get the balance right

  • Encourage everyone in your team to have a great life balance (I dislike the term work-life balance…) and make sure you do to
  • Recognise and encourage extra-curricular activities for everyone
  • Make sure everyone learns from what they do outside work, including you

Be open, honest and transparent

  • People sense BS when they hear it and see it. In Australia and New Zealand in particular, people are cynical and see through cheap talk very quickly
  • So, be upfront and direct
  • Give people the news, good or bad, quickly
  • And expect that in return
  • Make sure you take bad news well

Adopt a curious mindset

  • Constantly seek new ways and experiences
  • Keep in touch with changing demographics
  • Stay up to date with technology
  • Understand what’s happening in other industries and business
  • Listen to your people with an open mind, and always hear them out
  • Be supportive, and do not be overly critical

Be passionate and consistent about the Purpose

  • To create followship, people need to know where you are taking them and feel confident you are passionate about getting them there
  • And if you say something, mean it.
  • And if you commit to do something, do it.

Begin with the end in mind, and curate

  • Stay the course on your plans
  • Sure, curate along the way to adapt and improve
  • But, only change radically when you have to, and when you do change, change fast and very effectively
  • Confidence in the plan is important to followship

Expect more of everyone’s leadership

  • And make sure everyone knows what that means, and what is expected of them
  • Remember, everyone needs some ground rules
  • But focus on what’s important, not everything
  • And here’s a novel idea, if you add a new focus area, take one away
  • Delegate authority with accountability and responsibility

Synergy doesn’t come from individuals. It comes from teams.

So to deliver the slingshot effect of synergy, build cohesive teams!

Innovate your brand!

One of my Rules of Transformational Leadership is that “Your Reputation is Everything, So Protect it!”

Another of my rules is “Innovate Incessantly”

Now, what happens if the two don’t align?

What happens if your brand isn’t one that is associated with innovation?

Houston, we have a problem!
Because our brand isn’t what we think it is; it’s what other people think.

Ok, so when I read this article on the weekend, I found a solution.

Here’s the ARTICLE

And here’s what it says (I’ve adapted it slightly but the core principles are spot on):

  1. Associate yourself with the concept of innovation – read extensively, write a blog, send emails to lots of smart people every week. Day to day incidents will bring the anecdotes to life and you will start BEcoming the innovator.
  2. Take the time to practice innovative thinking – set aside some time each week – it’s a skill, and it is something you get better at with time. And spend time innovating with other people – shared experience and shared learning.
  3. Think about past life experiences and learn from them – what would you do differently next time? Why didn’t it work? What did you learn? You innovated and can do it again!
  4. Learn how successful innovators execute. Ideas need execution and execution is critical. Research it; ask questions; be intensely curious.
  5. So are people critical. Hang around with smart people who execute brilliantly. Engage them early.
  6. Look the part. Ok, seems glib, but people do judge a book by its cover. The book still needs to be a good read but looking the part helps.

Travel well!